You are here:

Single Post with Standard format

Single Post with Standard format

When we think of cardiovascular health, physical activity – such as running – often comes to mind. But new research shows that running a marathon can prompt heart muscle changes that cause the heart to swell, and this is particularly the case in runners with lower fitness levels.

The researchers, who reported their findings in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, say previous studies have found that many sports competitors show signs of injury to the heart muscle and cardiac abnormalities after they exercise for long periods of time.

The new study was created to assess the degree to which running a marathon stresses the heart, and whether it might cause permanent damage.

As such, the researchers studied 20 amateur long-distance runners between the ages of 18 and 60, who were going to run in the Quebec City Marathon. The runners had no known cardiovascular disease and were not on any kind of drug treatment.

The researchers excluded any runners who had run a marathon in the 2 months before recruitment or during the study period.
Cardiac risk associated with running

Tested 6-8 weeks before the marathon and on the day of the race, the runners were also tested again within 48 hours of completing the marathon. This test included a second MRI and blood sampling.

The researchers say this timeframe ensured sufficient rehydration and a return to normal heart and blood pressure rates after the race. But importantly, it was short enough for them to observe any myocardial changes.

In half of the runners, researchers observed that the marathon prompted a decrease in left and right ventricular function. And when a lot of the heart was affected, there was swelling and reduced blood flow in the heart.

Dr. Eric Larose, of the Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec (IUCPQ) in Canada, says that the heart muscle changes they observed were more common in runners who had lower fitness levels and who trained less.

But they also observed that these changes were temporary.

Dr. Larose says:

Segmental function decrease is associated with poor prognosis in the presence of CAD (coronary artery disease) or cardiomyopathy. Segmental dysfunction also indicates a poor prognosis in adults without cardiovascular disease.

Although we don’t know whether such changes mean that recreational runners are at risk, the attendant edema, and reduced perfusion suggest transient injury

  • Rated by Author
  • Special Effects5
  • Story line4
  • Casting4
  • Casting4
  • Overall Score4.25
Tagged with: 

Related articles
 

4 Comments
 

  • Hoa Nguyen

    November 23, 2013 - 2:14 AM

    Cras consequat tellus massa. Maecenas vulputate nibh vel tortor malesuada, sit amet posuere

    • Hoa Nguyen

      December 25, 2013 - 9:27 AM

      Donec quis elit in risus malesuada suscipit. Suspendisse bibendum urna at risus tempus ultrices. Nam non luctus nibh. Quisque condimentum leo cursus pellentesque iaculis. Donec accumsan odio non dui porttitor, et malesuada lorem ullamcorper.

  • Hoa Nguyen

    December 25, 2013 - 9:27 AM

    Suspendisse bibendum urna at risus tempus ultrices. Nam non luctus nibh. Quisque condimentum leo cursus pellentesque iaculis. Donec accumsan odio non dui porttitor, et malesuada lorem ullamcorper.

    • Hoa Nguyen

      December 25, 2013 - 9:27 AM

      Donec quis elit in risus malesuada suscipit. Suspendisse bibendum urna at risus tempus ultrices. Nam non luctus nibh. Quisque condimentum leo cursus pellentesque iaculis. Donec accumsan odio non dui porttitor, et malesuada lorem ullamcorper.

Comments are closed.

Contact Us
 

  • THE STAT TRADE TIMES
    Editorial & Administrative Office,
    (Post Bag - 10), 712 Vindhya Comm.
    Complex Sector-11, Central Business District.
    New Bombay - 400614 INDIA.
    Tel :(+91 22) 27570550 / 27578941
    Fax : (+91 22) 27572382/ 27526202
    Email : info@stattimes.com

STAT Media Channel
 

Back to Top

loading